Archives par mot-clé : Antarctic

New map of Antarctic geothermal heat suggests Steig & Mann 2009 weren’t measuring ‘global warming’

by Anthony Watts, November 15, 2017 in WUWT


This is quite interesting. Remember the claim in on the front cover of Nature in 2009 by Steig and Mann that Antarctica was warming, thanks to that “special Mannian PCA math sauce” that was applied to air temperature data to smear surface temperature trends over the entire continent? It was dashed by climate skeptics who wrote a paper. It was accepted for publication and disproved (in my opinion) by a team of credible skeptics that wrote a counter-paper. But, there’s an interesting twist thanks to new and surprising data; Steig and Mann may have captured surface air temperature trends in the exact same areas that have been identified as geothermal hot spots.

NASA – Supervolcano may be melting Antarctic ice sheet from below

by Robert, November 10, 2017 in NASA


Confirms what I’ve been saying all along!
NASA scientists admit that a massive heat source almost as hot as the Yellowstone supervolcano may be melting the Antarctic ice sheet from below. 

It seems like a no-brainer to me. I mean, how can lakes and rivers be flowing beneath the ice unless there’s a heat source down there? And if sub-glacial volcanoes can be melting the ice, why couldn’t underwater volcanoes be heating the sea

Hot News from the Antarctic Underground

by Alan Buis, November, 7, 2017, in JPL, NASA


Study Bolsters Theory of Heat Source Under West Antarctica

A new NASA study adds evidence that a geothermal heat source called a mantle plume lies deep below Antarctica’s Marie Byrd Land, explaining some of the melting that creates lakes and rivers under the ice sheet. Although the heat source isn’t a new or increasing threat to the West Antarctic ice sheet, it may help explain why the ice sheet collapsed rapidly in an earlier era of rapid climate change, and why it is so unstable today.

Estimating the extent of Antarctic summer sea ice during the Heroic Age of Antarctic Exploration

by T. Edimburgh and J. Day, November 21, 2017, in TheCryopshere


In stark contrast to the sharp decline in Arctic sea ice, there has been a steady increase in ice extent around Antarctica during the last three decades, especially in the Weddell and Ross seas. In general, climate models do not to capture this trend and a lack of information about sea ice coverage in the pre-satellite period limits our ability to quantify the sensitivity of sea ice to climate change and robustly validate climate models

Surprise: Defying Models, Antarctic Sea Ice Extent 100 Years Ago Similar To Today

by P. Gosselin, October 17, 2017 in NoTricksZone

from Dr. L. Lüning and Prof. F. Vahrenbolt


Satellite measurements of Antarctic sea ice do not go back even 40 years. That’s not very much, especially when we consider that many natural climate cycles have periods of 60 years and more.

Luckily we have the field of climate reconstruction. Using historical documents and sediment cores, the development of ice cover can be estimated. In November, 2016, Tom Edinburg and Jonathan Day examined shipping log books from the time of Antarctic explorers and published on ice extent in The Cryosphere (…)

Antarctique: des milliers de bébés manchots meurent de faim en terre Adélie

by l’express, 13 october 2017


La découverte a été effectuée par des scientifiques français du CNRS, dans ce groupe qui vivait sur l’île de Petrels, en terre Adélie. Hormis les deux bébés manchots survivants, ils n’ont retrouvé que des corps d’animaux affamés et des oeufs non-éclos. Ces chercheurs, soutenus par le Fonds mondial pour la nature (WWF), observaient depuis 2010 cette colonie. Selon eux, l’étendue inhabituelle de la banquise a contraint les parents à aller plus loin chercher leur nourriture. Leur progéniture ont succombé à la faim.

News From Vostok Ice Cores

by Richard Taylor, October 6, 2017 in WUWT


A Russian team, however, has been active establishing a chronology of deuterium from snow-cores and -pits near the Vostok station (A.A. Ekaykin, et al., 2014). A summary (www.ncdc.noaa.gov/paleo/study/22532) with digital data became available in May, 2017. The data include annual measurements from 1654 to 2010, providing an overlap with the ice-core record that enables an assessment of present conditions from the perspective of ice-core record.

Sea Ice Extent Sinks to Record Lows at Both Poles

by Maria-José Vinas, August 4, 2017 in Nasa.gov


“It is tempting to say that the record low we are seeing this year is global warming finally catching up with Antarctica,” Meier said. “However, this might just be an extreme case of pushing the envelope of year-to-year variability. We’ll need to have several more years of data to be able to say there has been a significant change in the trend.”