Archives par mot-clé : Hydrocarbon

Ce n’est pas le pétrole qui disparaît, c’est la demande de pétrole

by Philippe Simonnot, 12 october 2017 in Le Causeur


Le prix du baril de pétrole, qui était de 1 dollar en 1972, est monté à près de 150  dollars en 2013, avec des projections qui le voyaient aller jusqu’à 300  dollars. Et le voilà retombé aujourd’hui aux alentours de 50  dollars. Pour expliquer une évolution aussi spectaculaire, il faut comprendre que le pétrole a été à un moment  un prix politique, mais que la loi du marché a pris sa revanche

Les chiffres clés de l’énergie dans le monde

by Connaissance des Energies, 26 septembre 2017


Les énergies fossiles toujours omniprésentes dans le mix mondial

La consommation mondiale d’énergie primaire a encore reposé à 81,4% sur les énergies fossiles en 2015 selon les dernières données de l’AIE. En 1973, cette part atteignait 86,7% (dont 46,2% pour le seul pétrole) et les énergies décarbonées ont ainsi légèrement progressé dans le mix énergétique mondial.

Notons que les productions mondiales de gaz naturel et de charbon ont respectivement triplé et plus que doublé depuis 1973. Les émissions mondiales de CO2 relatives à la combustion d’énergie ont pour leur part doublé durant cette période.

See also here (.pdf 151 pages)

‘Game-Changing’ new research on prolific Permian Basin estimates 60 billion to 70 billion barrels remain, IHS Markit says

by PennEnergy Editorial Staff, September 25, 2017


Energy researchers at IHS Markit have completed the first, three-year phase of a massive Permian Basin research project that models and interprets the giant basin’s key geologic characteristics to better estimate its remaining hydrocarbon potential, and initial results indicate the giant basin still holds an estimated 60 billion to 70 billion barrels of technically recoverable resources.
To conduct this new analysis, researchers used the IHS Markit historical well and production database that includes more than 440,000 Permian Basin wells, and a new proprietary software tool that, for the first time, enables them to leverage interpreted formation ‘tops’ data to identify accurate formations for completion intervals on hundreds of thousands of wells

EIA: World energy consumption to increase 28% by 2040

by Oil&Gas Journal Editors, September 14, 2017


World energy consumption is projected to rise to 736 quadrillion btu (quads) in 2040 from 575 quads in 2015, an increase of 28%, according to the latest International Energy Outlook 2017 (IEO2017) from the US Energy Information Administration.

Most of this growth is expected to come from countries that are not in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development and especially in countries where demand is driven by strong economic growth, particularly in Asia. Non-OECD Asia, which includes China and India, accounts for more than 60% of the world’s total increase in energy consumption from 2015 through 2040.

Which oil and gas companies are preparing for the future? Executive Summary

by Tarek Soliman et al., November 2019, in CDPinthe pipeline


  • This report introduces CDP’s League Table for oil and gas companies, highlighting company performance across a range of portfolio, emissions and water-related metrics which indicate carbon risk preparedness and highlights earnings risks for oil and gas companies.
  • Highest ranked companies are Statoil, Eni and Total.
  • Lowest ranked companies are Suncor, ExxonMobil and Chevron.

Drilling set to begin in British shale

by Daniel J. Graeber, July 28, 2017


“With the decline of North Sea gas and our ever increasing reliance on gas imports, including shale gas imported from the United States, developing an indigenous source of natural gas is critical for U.K. energy security, our economy, jobs and the environment,” Cuadrilla CEO Francis Egan said in a statement. “We are proud as a Lancashire company to be at the forefront of that effort.

“New study challenges prevailing theory about how deep-sea vents are colonized”… And hydrothermal oil!

by David Middleton, August 4, 2017 in WUWT


An article just published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B describes two remarkably different hydrothermal vent fields discovered in the southern Gulf of California. Despite being relatively close together, these vents host very different animal communities. This finding contradicts a common scientific assumption that neighboring vents will share similar animal communities. Instead, the new paper suggests that local geology and the chemistry of the vent fluids are important factors affecting vent communities

See aslo here