Archives par mot-clé : Sea level

Smaller Trends and No Acceleration of Mediterranean Sea Levels

by S. Zerbini et al., 2017 in Earth-Science Reviews


Zerbini et al. also investigated/tested for the existence of an acceleration of sea level rise in each of the six Mediterranean station’s data, reporting that « our analysis indicates that it is not possible to reliably state the existence of any acceleration, in the area of this study, considering the past 140 years or so, from 1870 through 2012. »

SEA LEVEL: Rise and Fall – Part 1

by Kip Hansen, September 13, 2017 in WUWT


I have written about sea level rise here:  here, here, here, here and here.  The previous essays are not prerequisites but are interesting specific examples.

There are two important points which readers must be aware of from the first mention of SLR:

  1. SLR is a real imminent threat to coastal cities and low-lying coastal and near-coastal densely-populated areas.

  2. SLR is not a threat to anything else — not now, not in a hundred years — probably not in a thousand years — maybe, not ever.

Past Sea Levels Rose 4-6 Meters Per Century, Shorelines Retreated 40 Meters Per Year…Without CO2 Flux

by Kenneth Richard, September 7, 2017 in NoTricksZone


This modern rate  –  just 0.17-0.18 of a meter per century has remained relatively unchanged from the overall 20th century average, and there has been no statistically significant acceleration in the sea level rise rate (just 0.0042 mm/yr-²) since 1900.

Water Intrusion in the Chesapeake Bay Region: Is It Caused by Climate-Induced Sea Level Rise?

by Roger H. Bezdek, August 2017 in SciRes


Our findings indicate that the water intrusion problems in the region are due not to “sea level rise”, but primarily to land subsidence due to groundwater depletion and, to a lesser extent, subsidence from glacial isostatic adjustment. We conclude that water intrusion will thus continue even if sea levels decline. These findings are critical because the water intrusion problems in the Chesapeake Bay—and elsewhere—cannot be successfully solved unless their causes are correctly identified and appropriate remedies are devised.

Sea Level Manipulation

by Nils-Axel Mörner, August 5,  2017, in  J. Eng.Sci.Invention


Sea level changes is a key issue in the global warming scenario. It has been widely claimed that sea is rising as a function of the late 20th’s warming pulse. Global tide gauge data sets may vary between +1.7 mm/yr to +0.25 mm/yr depending upon the choice of stations. At numerous individual sites, available tide gauges show variability around a stable zero level …

… In this situation, it is recommended that we return to the observational facts, which provides global sea level records varying between ±0.0 and +1.0 mm/yr; i.e. values that pose no problems in coastal protection.

See also here

An Inconvenient Deception: How Al Gore Distorts Climate Science and Energy Policy

by Roy W.  Spencer, Ph. D., August 19, 2017 in GlobalWarming


Al Gore has provided a target-rich environment of deceptions in his new movie.

After viewing Gore’s most recent movie, An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power, and after reading the book version of the movie, I was more than a little astounded. The new movie and book are chock-full of bad science, bad policy, and factual errors.

Exposing Staggering Ice Sheet Melt Deceptions

by Kenneth Richard, August 7, 2017 in NoTricksZone reposted Paul Homewood


In recent months, two new papers published in The Cryosphere have provided a condensed summary of the ice-melt and sea-level-rise consequences of global warming for the Arctic region.

1.  Between 1900 and 2010, the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) has melted so extensively and so rapidly that the GIS ice-melt contribution to global sea level rise has amounted to 1.5 centimeters for the entire 110-year period.   One-and-a-half centimeters.  That’s 0.59 of an inch!

2. It gets worse.  Between 1993 and 2010, the contribution to global sea level rise has been a disturbing 0.39 of a centimeter.  Almost 4/10ths of a centimeter.  That’s 0.15 of an inch!

NASA shows sea levels falling since 2016

by Robert W. Felix in ClimateChangeDispatch



That’s right, according to NASA, sea levels are going DOWN! This is big news. How come the media hasn’t mentioned it?

NASA satellite sea level observations for the past 24 years show that – on average – sea levels have been rising 3.4 millimeters per year. That’s 0.134 inches, about the thickness of a dime and a nickel stacked together, per year.

See also here (nasa.gov)

Sea Level Rise per Jevrejeva

by Paul Homewood, July 25, 2017


I’ve looked at UK sea level rise, but what about global?

As you can see, the rate of rise was very similar between roughly 1930 to 1960, as it has been since 1990. We see the same pattern at UK sites.

David’s graph mirrors that of the original paper. As with most sources of sea level data, the scale is set to make the rise appear to be astronomic.

Given that the IPCC is forecasting a rise of a meter and more by 2100, a more appropriate scale would look like this …

See also here