Archives de catégorie : energy and fields

Gilmer: We Should View The Permian Basin As A Permanent Resource

by David Blackmon, August 17, 2017 in Forbes


« We should view the Permian Basin as a permanent resource, » he says, « The Permian is best viewed as a near infinite resource – we will never produce the last drop of economic oil from the Basin. »

No one disputes that the resource in the Permian is huge, but ‘infinite’ is a big word.  I asked him to expand on that concept.

See also here

Drilling set to begin in British shale

by Daniel J. Graeber, July 28, 2017


« With the decline of North Sea gas and our ever increasing reliance on gas imports, including shale gas imported from the United States, developing an indigenous source of natural gas is critical for U.K. energy security, our economy, jobs and the environment, » Cuadrilla CEO Francis Egan said in a statement. « We are proud as a Lancashire company to be at the forefront of that effort.

Venezuela : malédiction du pétrole ou du socialisme ?

par Samuel Furfari, 8 août 2017


Le Venezuela se trouve à la croisée des chemins. Se dirige-t-il vers le modernisme ou va-t-il poursuivre sa révolution bolivarienne vers le socialisme qui l’a conduit à la débâcle à laquelle nous assistons aujourd’hui ?

Le pays possède tout ce qu’il faut pour connaitre la prospérité et la paix. Ses abondantes ressources d’hydrocarbures auraient pu en faire la Norvège de l’Amérique latine

…Next Generation of Fossil Fuels…

by Donn Dears, August 2017


As noted in my article four years ago, Japan has a program for producing natural gas from methane hydrates located near its coast, and predicts it will be successful by 2019.

Most people believe that Japan’s objective is highly optimistic, but it does shed light on the efforts currently underway to develop the technology for extracting natural gas from methane hydrates.

Industrie du pétrole : qui sont les « supermajors » ?

by Connaissance des Energies, 8 août 2016


      Les 5 supermajors sont par ordre de chiffre d’affaires en 2015 :
  • Royal Dutch Shell (Pays-Bas) : 272,2 milliards de dollars et une production de 3,0 millions de barils équivalents pétrole par jour contre 421,1 G$ et 3,1 Mbeb/j en 2014);
  • ExxonMobil (États-Unis) : 268,9 G$ et 4,1 Mbeb/j (contre 411,9 G$ et 4,0 Mbeb/j en 2014) ;
  • BP (Royaume-Uni) : 226,0 G$ et 3,3 Mbep/j (contre 359,8 G$ et 3,2 Mbep/j en 2014);
  • Total (France): 165,4 G$ et 2,3 Mbep/j (contre 236,1 G$ et 2,15 Mbep/j en 2014) ;
  • Chevron (États-Unis): 138,5 G$ et 2,6 Mbep/j (contre 200,5 G$ et 2,6 Mbep/j en 2014).

U.S. becomes global fossil energy giant feeding hungry world energy markets

by WUWT, July 25, 2017


U.S. evolves into coal, gas and oil global energy giant supplying world’s hungry energy markets

David Middleton’s excellent WUWT article addressing the resurgence of the American coal industry as well as the growing role of U.S. natural gas production in creating global gas export markets hits the nail on the head in demonstrating how dominant the U.S. has become in producing and supplying global energy markets at home and abroad with growing demands for fossil fuels.

The IEA agency clearly recognizes the U.S. as the global driver of a huge transformation of the world’s natural gas energy markets.

Thank finance for sharp oil price decline

by Steve Austin, July 26, 2017 in Oil-Price.Net


US wins, Middle East loses

While US scores with increased rig count and production, the oil industry in the Middle-East is festering with under investment. Said to be in trillions, the lack of investment could boomerang as supply deficit within a decade. Let’s not forget that oil exploration is a long term development in which a decade is but short. Why are the investors moving away?

The Only Way OPEC Can Kill U.S. Shale

by Irina Slav, July 16, 2017 in OilPrice


Weinberg advised OPEC to change tack and go back to what it set out to do initially: stifle U.S. shale by pumping at maximum. “They should let prices crash to kill shale and then aim for steady price increases in the long term,” Weinstein told Bloomberg. The question remains, however, whether OPEC, with oil-reliant budgets already strained, could afford this tactic reversal now that they’ve suffered price lows for an extended period of time.

 

US Has Produced More Oil Than Saudi Arabia For 4 Straight Years

by Andrew Follett, July 7, 2017


Saudi Arabia has lagged the U.S. in oil production for the last four years, according to federal data compiled by University of Michigan economist Mark Perry.

Perry created a chart Saturday showing just how far behind Saudi oil production has trailed U.S. production. Rising U.S. production combined with OPEC policies drove crude oil prices down to new lows. Monday, a barrel of oil costs $46.26, while the same barrel would have sold for $109.04 in June 2014.