Archives par mot-clé : Sea level

A 500-Year Record of Sea Level from Goa, India

by N.-A. Mörner, June 2017, in J. Coastal Research


Fortunately, as revealed in a number of recent studies, proof of such an acceleration of sea level rise remains elusive (see the many reviews we have posted on this topic under the subheading of Sea Level here). The latest work to demonstrate that there is nothing unusual, unnatural or unprecedented about current rates of sea level rise comes from a paper written by sea level expert Nils-Axel Mörner (Mörner, 2017) and published in the Journal of Coastal Research.

Elévation du niveau de la mer : la précision millimétrique des observations satellitaires est-elle crédible ?

by ‘Uskek’ , 16 juin 2017, in Climato-Réalistes


Les mesures satellitaires  prétendent mesurer l’élévation du niveau de la mer avec une précision millimétrique. Or La précision des radars altimétriques s’exprime en centimètres. Comment  dans ces conditions parvient-on à mesurer un taux d’élévation du niveau de la mer de 3,4 mm par an sur la période 1993-2015 ?

Acceleration in European Mean Sea Level? A New Insight Using Improved Tools

by Phil J. Watson, Journal of Coastal research, May 2017


Key findings are that at the 95% confidence level, no consistent or compelling evidence (yet) exists that recent rates of rise are higher or abnormal in the context of the historical records available across Europe, nor is there any evidence that geocentric rates of rise are above the global average. It is likely a further 20 years of data will distinguish whether recent increases are evidence of the onset of climate change–induced acceleration.

Recent Sea-Level Change at Major Cities

by Rich Taylor, March 29, 2017


Where the ground is stable, typical change appears to be a rise of 1- to 2-mm/y. Rates above 3 mm/y seem to have a substantial component of natural and/or anthropogenic subsidence. Rates above 10 mm/y appear to be a primarily a consequence of human activity, which implies they should be manageable to some degree.

All records in this review are from the website www.psmsl.org of the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level.