CO2 emission, CO2 absorption

by Alan Siddons, July 26, 2017


The chart below is taken directly from figures provided by the U.S. government’s Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) website, specifically its 2016 Global Carbon Project spreadsheet on the Historical Budget tab. In terms of gigatons of carbon, and from 1770 to 2004, it itemizes the growth rate of radiative forcing by atmospheric CO2 and the growth rate of oceanic absorption, what is known as a “carbon sink.”

Prof Peter Ridd: the Great Barrier Reef recovers, our science institutions are failing us, science needs to be checked

by Alan Jones, interviews peter Ridd, July 28,  2017 in JoNova


Corals have a little thermometer built in them, when you take a core of them from many years ago we know what the temperature of the water was back when Captain Cook sailed up the coast, it was actually about the same temperature then. It was colder 100 years ago, but it has recovered from that. The temperatures on the reef are not even significantly warmer than average on a hundred year timescale.

Corals that bleach in one year will be less susceptible to bleaching in following years

Does Belgian Holocene speleothem records solar forcing and cold events?

by M. Allan et al., July 11,  2017, in Climate of the Past


We present a decadal-centennial scale Holocene climate record based on trace elements contents from a 65 cm stalagmite (“Père Noël”) from Belgian Père Noël cave. Père Noël (PN) stalagmite covers the last 12.7 ka according to U/Th dating. High spatial resolution measurements of trace elements (Sr, Ba, Mg and Al) were done by Laser- Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Trace elements profiles were interpreted as environmental and climate changes in the Han-sur-Lesse region.

See also here

New York Times Shifts Towards Extreme Climate Fraud

by Tony Heller, July 29, 2017 in DeplorableClimateScinceBlog


The New York Times said yesterday that heatwaves in the past were “virtually unheard of in the 1950s”, temperatures approaching 130 degrees didn’t used to occur, and summer temperatures have shifted towards more extreme heat.

(…) Every single claim in the article is patently false, and the exact opposite of reality. The authors intentionally started their study in a cold period, after the extreme heat of the 1930’s.

The IPCC gives us good news about climate change, but we don’t listen

by Larry Kummer, July 29, 2017, in WUWT

Now that the alarmists have had their day trumpeting the IPCC’s worst case scenario (it’s unlikely and becoming more so), let’s look at their best case scenario (hidden by journalists). The risk probabilities are asymmetric: the good news is more likely than the bad news. This is inspirational, telling people that we can make a better world.

Primary energy use per year (in EJ), by source


Plastics Yet Again

by Kip Hansen, July 28, 2017 in WUWT


The New York Times’ article breathlessly reports:

“From the 1950s to today, 8.3 billion metric tons of plastic have been produced, with around half of it made since 2004. And since plastic does not naturally degrade, the billions of tons sitting in landfills, floating in the oceans or piling up on city streets will provide a marker if later civilizations ever want to classify our era. Perhaps they will call this time on Earth the Plastocene Epoch.”

Industrie du pétrole : qui sont les « supermajors » ?

by Connaissance des Energies, 8 août 2016


      Les 5 supermajors sont par ordre de chiffre d’affaires en 2015 :
  • Royal Dutch Shell (Pays-Bas) : 272,2 milliards de dollars et une production de 3,0 millions de barils équivalents pétrole par jour contre 421,1 G$ et 3,1 Mbeb/j en 2014);
  • ExxonMobil (États-Unis) : 268,9 G$ et 4,1 Mbeb/j (contre 411,9 G$ et 4,0 Mbeb/j en 2014) ;
  • BP (Royaume-Uni) : 226,0 G$ et 3,3 Mbep/j (contre 359,8 G$ et 3,2 Mbep/j en 2014);
  • Total (France): 165,4 G$ et 2,3 Mbep/j (contre 236,1 G$ et 2,15 Mbep/j en 2014) ;
  • Chevron (États-Unis): 138,5 G$ et 2,6 Mbep/j (contre 200,5 G$ et 2,6 Mbep/j en 2014).