Archives de catégorie : climate-debate

Past Sea Levels Rose 4-6 Meters Per Century, Shorelines Retreated 40 Meters Per Year…Without CO2 Flux

by Kenneth Richard, September 7, 2017 in NoTricksZone


This modern rate  –  just 0.17-0.18 of a meter per century has remained relatively unchanged from the overall 20th century average, and there has been no statistically significant acceleration in the sea level rise rate (just 0.0042 mm/yr-²) since 1900.

The evolution of Hurricane Irma’s disinformation campaign

by Paul Homewood, September 7, 2017 in ClimateChangeDispatch


(…)

In other words, there have now been four hurricanes as strong or stronger since 1980, about one every decade, and certainly nothing like the “unprecedented” impression left by the headlines.

And as we know, prior to Allen in 1980, we had very little in the way of measurements in mid-ocean.

A closer look at the Labor Day Hurricane of 1935, widely acknowledged to be by far the most powerful storm to hit the US, emphasizes this fact.

Unanticipated Stability: Latest Polar Conditions Show No Signs Of Global Warming Melting

by P. Gosselin, August 16, 2017 in NoTricksZone


Weather and climate analyst Schneefan here writes of “early frost” in the Arctic and how Greenland snow and ice have grown after being hit by a “snow bomb”. This contradicts the expectations of global warming alarmists.

The polar summer this year appears to have ended prematurely. The mean temperature of the central Arctic above 80°N has remained under the long-term average over the entire summer and even dipped below the freezing point about a week earlier than normal (1958-2002 mean).

Evènements naturels extrêmes : pas d’augmentation

by Uzbek, 7 février 2017, in ClimatoRéalistes


Il se produit en moyenne 300 catastrophes naturelles par an, soit presque une par jour ; nous en sommes informés en temps réel  et la responsabilité du réchauffement est presque systématiquement invoquée. Il se diffuse ainsi dans l’opinion l’idée d’un dérèglement climatique qui irait en s’accentuant sous l’effet du réchauffement. Les différentes sources de données  exploitées dans cet article sont convergentes : il n’y a pas d’augmentation de la fréquence , de l’intensité et de la durée des événements  extrêmes depuis le début de l’ère industrielle, qu’il s’agisse des cyclones et des tempêtes, des inondations, des sécheresses et des vagues de chaleur . Cela est d’ailleurs admis par le GIEC dans son rapport spécial sur les événements extrêmes de 2012, et dans son 5ème rapport d’évaluation de 2013.

Voir également ici, ici et  ici 

Texas Major Hurricane Intensity Not Related to Gulf Water Temperatures

by Ph.D.  Roy Spencer, August 29th, 2017 in GlobalWarming


As the Houston flood disaster is unfolding, there is considerable debate about whether Hurricane Harvey was influenced by “global warming”. While such an issue matters little to the people of Houston, it does matter for our future infrastructure planning and energy policy.

Let’s review the two basic reasons why the Houston area is experiencing what now looks like a new record amount of total rainfall, at least for a 2-3 day period over an area of tens of thousands of square miles.

Why ‘Hide The Decline’? There Has Been No Net NH Warming Since The 1940s

by Kenneth Richard, August 31, 2017 in NoTricksZone


In the press release for a newly published and controversial  peer-reviewed scientific paper, Australian scientist Dr. Jennifer Marohasy unveiled one of climate science’s better-kept secrets.

She and her colleagues are well aware that the post-1940s Northern Hemisphere (NH)  proxy evidence from tree-rings, bore holes, pollen, etc., consistently fails to affirm sharply rising temperatures from the late 20th century onwards.

Evidence for Little Ice Age in Antarctica

by UC Santa Cruz Newscenter, August 31, 2017 in WUWT


Changes in the sources of nitrogen and the composition of the phytoplankton community are more likely to account for the differences seen in the isotope data, Huckstadt said. “It looks more like a shift at the base of the food web, probably related to the transition from the Little Ice Age to current conditions, causing changes in the phytoplankton community,” he said.

See also: “Here we present new data from the Ross Sea, Antarctica, that indicates surface temperatures were ~ 2 °C colder during the LIA, with colder sea surface temperatures in the Southern Ocean and/or increased sea-ice extent, stronger katabatic winds, and decreased snow accumulation.”

Soil carbon debt of 12,000 years of human land use

by J. Sanderman et al., July 2017 in PNAS


Human appropriation of land for agriculture has greatly altered the terrestrial carbon balance, creating a large but uncertain car- bon debt in soils. Estimating the size and spatial distribution of soil organic carbon (SOC) loss due to land use and land cover change has been difficult but is a critical step in understand- ing whether SOC sequestration can be an effective climate mitigation strategy.

See also here

Climate-driven variability in the occurrence of major floods across North America and Europe

by Glenn A. Hodgkins et al., September 2017 in Journal of Hydrology


 

Trends in major-floods from 1204 sites in North America and Europe are assessed.

Trends based on counting exceedances of flood thresholds for groups of gauges.

The number of significant trends was about the number expected due to chance alone.

Changes in the frequency of major floods are dominated by multidecadal variability.

See also here