Archives par mot-clé : Green Energy

‘Very, very scary’: This mammoth new shale drilling method is about to supersize the future of fracking

by Alex Nussbaum, February 23, 2018 in BloombergNews


Cube development,’ which taps multiple layers of shale all at once, could accelerate the U.S. shale boom and make the global supply glut even worse.

In the scrublands of West Texas there’s an oil-drilling operation like few that have come before.

Encana Corp.’s RAB Davidson well pad is so mammoth, the explorer speaks of it in military terms, describing its efforts here as an occupation. More than 1 million pounds of drilling rigs, bulldozers, tanker trucks and other equipment spread out over a dusty 16-acre expanse. As of November, the 19 wells here collectively pumped almost 20,000 barrels of crude per day, according to company reports.

Where Do We Get Most Of Our Energy (Hint: Not Renewables)

by Bjorn Lomborg, February 20, 2018 in ClimateChangeDispatch


The world is mostly run on fossil fuels (81%). Nuclear makes up 5%, with 14% from renewables. Solar panels and wind turbines contribute 0.8%.

When you hear 14% renewables, you will likely think ‘wow, things are going pretty well with the switch to renewables’. But these renewables are not the ones you hear about. The biggest contributor is humanity’s oldest fuel: wood (…)

GREEN MYTH EXPOSED: CHINA’S CO2 EMISSIONS JUMPED BY 4% LAST YEAR

by The New York Times, January 26, 2018 in GWPF


Experts say one annual increase doesn’t indicate China is returning to an era when its emissions grew by leaps and bounds. But the increase illustrates the challenges and compromises Beijing must juggle if it wants to stoke its economy and at the same time keep its environmental promises. […]

See also here and  here

MUGGED BY REALITY, GERMANY’S CLIMATE CONSENSUS IS COLLAPSING

by Benny Peiser, November 11, 2017, in GWPF


Germany’s utopian dream of transforming itself into the world’s green powerhouse is collapsing as its political and media establishment is mugged by reality. The country’s climate obsession has turned into one of the country’s biggest political and economic handicaps, making Germany almost ungovernable.

See also here

Carbon Loophole: Why Is Wood Burning Counted as Green Energy?

by Fred Pearce, December 19, 2017 in Yale Environment360


In September, some 200 scientists wrote to the EU insisting that “bioenergy [from forest biomass] is not carbon-neutral” and calling for tighter rules to protect forests and their carbon. Yet just a month later, EU ministers rubber-stamped the existing carbon accounting rules, reaffirming that the burning of wood pellets is renewable energy.

BENNY PEISER: MUGGED BY REALITY, GERMANY’S CLIMATE CONSENSUS IS COLLAPSING

by Benny Peiser, November 11, 2017 in GWPF


Germany’s utopian dream of transforming itself into the world’s green powerhouse is collapsing as its political and media establishment is mugged by reality. The country’s climate obsession has turned into one of the country’s biggest political and economic handicaps, making Germany almost ungovernable.

See also here

Hidden consequences of intermittent electricity production

by Jozef Ongena et al., 2017 in Arguments


The hidden consequences of a massive use of intermittent renewable energy systems for electricity production are highlighted, using existing electricity production data from Germany from the last 5 years, where presently a system is in operation with an installed capacity of about 50 GW in wind turbines (sum of onshore and offshore wind) and 40GW in photovoltaic panels.This fleet of intermittent renewable systems produces more than half of the yearly renewable electrical energy of Germany, the rest being produced by hydro, so-called ‘biomass’ and a very small fraction of geothermal sources

Global energy investment fell for a second year in 2016 as oil and gas spending continues to drop

by International Energy Agency (iea), July 11, 2017


Global energy investment fell by 12% in 2016, the second consecutive year of decline, as increased spending on energy efficiency and electricity networks was more than offset by a continued drop in upstream oil and gas spending, according to the International Energy Agency’s annual World Energy Investment report.

Global energy investment amounted to USD 1.7 trillion in 2016, or 2.2% of global GDP. For the first time, spending on the electricity sector around the world exceeded the combined spending on oil, gas and coal supply. The share of clean-energy spending reached 43% of total supply investment, a record high.

Despite Paris accord, G-20 countries invest four times as much in fossil fuels as green energy

by Ben Wolfgang, July 5, 2017,  in The Washington Times


The biggest critics of President Trump’s decision to withdraw from the Paris climate accord are also the world’s biggest hypocrites on energy policy, top environmental groups charged Wednesday in a report that found many top nations’ rhetoric on cutting emissions doesn’t line up with how and where they spend their money.

The key finding: The G-20 nations spend roughly four times as much in public financing for fossil fuels as they do supporting renewable energy sources such as wind and solar. The report examines loans, grants, guarantees, insurance and other types of public finance offered either by the governments, government-owned financial institutions and credit agencies, and multilateral groups made up of G-20 countries.

L’Utopie du tout renouvelable

by J.P. Schaeken, Académie Roy Belgique, 18 juin 2017


Par Drieu Godefridi 
Je recommande vivement la lecture de ce tout petit (80 pages) ouvrage de synthèse sur l’électricité européenne.
 
Après la sortie américaine de l’Accord de Paris, il se confirme que l’Europe s’engagera, seule, dans la voie d’une électricité tout intégralement générée par de l’énergie renouvelable (soleil, vent).
Egalement ici

Hydroelectric dams may jeopardize the Amazon’s future

by University of Texas at Austin, June 14, 2017 in Science Daily


Hundreds of built and proposed hydroelectric dams may significantly harm life in and around the Amazon by trapping the flow of rich nutrients and modifying the climate from Central America to the Gulf of Mexico. These findings, published in Nature, emerge from a multidisciplinary, international collaboration of researchers from 10 universities, led by scientists at The University of Texas at Austin.

To meet energy needs, economic developers in South America have proposed 428 hydroelectric dams, with 140 currently built or under construction, in the Amazon basin — the largest and most complex network of river channels in the world, which sustains the highest biodiversity on Earth.