Archives par mot-clé : USA

Is climate change REALLY the culprit causing California’s wildfires?

by L. Kummer, December 14, 2017 in A. Watts, WUWT


We’re told that climate change caused or intensified California’s wildfires — and that such fires are getting worse. As usual for such scary stories, these claims are only weakly supported by science — except for the ones that are outright fabrications. See what scientists say and decide for yourself.

Dueling science: One study says melting Antarctic ice sheet will flood US east coast, others say ‘uncertain’

by Anthony Watts, December 13, 2017 in WUWT


(…) All of these press releases appeared within a couple of hours of each other on EurekAlert, which is a Science PR clearing house. They will all inevitably get turned into stories by the media. Who could blame the public for being confused when we have such certainty/uncertainty battles like this going on in climate science?

It seems Yogi Berra was right.

It’s tough to make predictions, especially about the future.

US East Coast Sea Level Rise: An Adjustocene Hockey Stick

by Steve McIntyre, November25, 2017 in ClimateAudit


(…) However, as so often, the supposed “hockey stick” appeared only after the data had been severely adjusted. The difference is shown at the figure at right.  Unadjusted (raw) relative sea level (i.e. how sea level appears locally – the concern of state planners and policy-makers) in North Carolina increased steadily through the last two millennia, with somewhat of an upward inflection in the 19th century; it is only after heavy adjustment that a HS shape appears.

NOAA’s USCRN Revisited – no significant warming in the USA in 12 years

by Willis Eschenbach, November 8, 2017, in WUWT


Back in 2014, Anthony put up a post called “NOAA shows ‘the pause’ in the U.S. surface temperature record over nearly a decade“. In it, he discussed the record of the US Climate Reference Network (USCRN). I can’t better Anthony’s description of the USCRN, so I’m stealing it to use here: (…)

See also here

Après le pétrole, le gaz américain comme nouveau “game changer” ?

by Patrice Geoffron, 23 octobre 2017 in Le CerclesdesEconmistes, Boursorama


 (…) le gaz américain pourrait bouleverser les équilibres mondiaux, avec des conséquences non moins drastiques que pour le pétrole. Les ressources américaines de gaz sont abondantes et, en juillet 2017, le prix interne a atteint son point le plus bas depuis 12 ans, augurant de sa compétitivité à l’export.

Numerical simulations to quantify the diurnal contrast in local climate trend induced by desert urbanization

by S. Kamal et al., September 30, 2017 in Environment SystemsDecisions


Within this scope, the results reveal a pattern of the climatic effect of desert urbanization with nighttime warming and weaker, but significant daytime cooling. This effect is confined to the urban area and is not sensitive to the size of the city or the detailed land cover types in the surrounding areas. The pattern is identified in both winter and summer.

Thanks to Shale, U.S. CO2 Emissions Continued to Decline in 2016

by Nicole Jacobs, October 3, 2017 in ClimateChangeDispatch


The report, which bases its CO2 emissions estimates off International Energy Agency (IEA) and BP data through 2016, found the global CO2 levels essentially remained flat in 2015 and 2016. As BP noted earlier this year, the global trend is “well below the 10-year average growth of 1.6% and a third consecutive year of below-average growth” and that “during 2014-16, average emissions growth has been the lowest over any three-year period since 1981-83.”

Catastrophic’ sea level rise in the past may have drowned corals in Hawaii

by University of Sydney, September 28, 2017 in WUWT


Recent findings suggest that episodes of very rapid sea-level rise of about 20m in less than 500 years occurred in the last deglaciation, caused by periods of catastrophic ice-sheet collapse as the Earth warmed after the last ice age about 20,000 years ago.

Lead author, PhD candidate at the University of Sydney, Kelsey Sanborn, has shown this sea-level rise event was associated with “drowning” or death of coral reefs in Hawaii.

See also here