Retrograde Accretion of a Caribbean Fringing Reef Controlled by Hurricanes and Sea-level Rise

by P. Blanchon et al., October 12, 2017 in Front.Earth.Sci


Predicting the impact of sea-level (SL) rise on coral reefs requires reliable models of reef accretion. Most assume that accretion results from vertical growth of coralgal framework, but recent studies show that reefs exposed to hurricanes consist of layers of coral gravel rather than in-place corals. New models are therefore needed to account for hurricane impact on reef accretion over geological timescales

Some Failed Climate Predictions

by Javier, October 30, 2017 in WUWT


Here, for the first time in public, is Javier’s entire collection of massive, “consensus” climate science prediction failures. This collection is carefully selected from only academics or high-ranking officials, as reported in the press or scientific journals. Rather than being exhaustive, this is a list of fully referenced arguments that shows that consensus climate science usually gets things wrong, and thus their predictions cannot be trusted.

Rapid Growth of Arctic Sea Ice Persists Thru Last Half of October

by Ron Clutz, October 30, 2017 in ClimateChangeDispatch


Extents expanded rapidly during the last 12 days of October through yesterday, especially on the Eurasian side. At the top center the Laptev Sea fills in completely, and to the left East Siberian Sea is also growing solid ice toward East Asia. Kara sea on the right is growing fast ice from the shore outward, while the Barents Sea fills in from the central Arctic.

An Informative Interview with István Markó

by Istvan Marko (1956-2017), October 28, 2017 in WUWT


This interview was published by Breitbart News Network, in an edited version, on 28 October 2017. Here is the complete version.

István Markó (1956 – 2017) was a professor and researcher in organic chemistry at the Université catholique de Louvain. Prof. Dr. Marko was an outspoken defender of the skeptical view on the issue of human-caused/anthropogenic global warming, appearing in numerous French-language media on the Internet, in public debates and diverse English-language blog postings. He also joined with Anglo-Saxon climate skeptics, publishing several articles together on Breitbart News.

Second interview (part 2) here

IEA sees Southeast Asia oil demand growing until at least 2040

by Florence Tan, October 26, 2017 in Reuters


SINGAPORE (Reuters) – Southeast Asian demand for oil will keep growing until at least 2040 as emerging nations there rely on the fossil fuel to transport their rapidly growing populations, ship goods and make plastics, the International Energy Agency said on Tuesday.

Oil usage in the region will expand to around 6.6 million barrels per day by 2040 from 4.7 million bpd now, with the number of road vehicles increasing by two-thirds to around 62 million, the agency said in a report. It did not make any forecasts beyond 2040.

Al Gore’s Apocalyptic Fantasy Lecture at Rice University

by Andy May, October 24, 2017 in WUWT


As promised, I attended Al Gore’s climate change lecture at Rice University last night. Rice University is one of the most beautiful university campuses I’ve ever seen, so it was a delight to see it again. The architecture is outstanding, and the buildings are placed in a garden-like setting. It was lovely to walk from the parking lot to the fieldhouse. The speech was held in a packed Tudor Fieldhouse which seats 5,750. By the time the Rice University Provost was introducing Al Gore, there were no empty seats that I could see, see Figure 1.

Lies and Manipulation: The Sorry State of Global Climate Alarmism

by Vijay Jayaraj, October 24, 2017 in WUWT


As a citizen of a third-world country, I bring a different perspective about climate change from that held by most people in wealthy countries. While they fret about possible tenth-of-a-degree changes in global average temperature, I think about how a billion of my fellow Indians and I will obtain the food, water, health care, and other things we need that our richer neighbors take for granted.

See also here