Un livre révèle “la plus fantastique opération de greenwashing de l’histoire”

by Mathieu Dejean, 6 janvier 2017 in LesInrockuptibles


Dans un essai édifiant, le journaliste Guillaume Pitron dévoile “la face cachée de la transition énergétique et numérique”. Selon lui, le recours aux éoliennes, panneaux solaires et autres véhicules électriques n’a fait que déplacer l’impact de l’activité humaine sur les écosystèmes.

Evaluating biases in Sea Surface Temperature records using coastal weather stations

by C Kevin, January 8, 2018 in SkepticalScience


Science is hard. Some easy problems you can solve by hard work, if you are in the right place at the right time and have the right skills. Hard problems take the combined effort of multiple groups looking at the problem, publishing results and finding fault with eachother’s work, until hopefully no-one can find any more problems. When problems are hard, you may have to publish something that even you don’t think is right, but that might advance the discussion.

The calculation of an unbiased sea surface temperature record is a hard problem. Historical sea surface temperature observations come from a variety of sources, with early records being measured using wooden, canvas or rubber buckets (figure 1), later readings being taken from engine room intakes or hull sensors, and the most recent data coming from drifting buoys and from satellites.

See alos here

England & Wales Precipitation Series For 2017

by Paul Homewood, January 8, 2018 in NotaLotofPeopleKnowThat


The England & Wales Precipitation Series has now been updated for last year.

Precipitation totalled 952mm during the year, slightly above the series average of 918mm. In ascending order, 2017 ranked 158th.

There seems to be little evidence of any real trends. Whatever trend can be winkled out of the numbers will likely be too small to notice, and swamped by the natural variability in the data.

The wettest years remain 1872 and 1768. The driest were 1788 and 1921.

Geopolitical risks to US oil supply lowest since the early 1970s

by Rice University, January 5, 2018 in Sciencedaily


The geopolitical risks to the United States’ oil supply are the lowest since the early 1970s, due to fracking, climate action and a more diverse global supply, according to a new paper. America’s energy prosperity contrasts with a more fraught period for energy-exporting countries where geopolitical challenges have been compounded by fiscal stress and rising domestic energy demand, the authors said.

Secretary Zinke Announces Plan For Unleashing America’s Offshore Oil and Gas Potential

by Press Release, U.S. Department of the Interior, January 1, 2018


 U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke today announced the next step for responsibly developing the National Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Leasing Program (National OCS Program) for 2019-2024, which proposes to make over 90 percent of the total OCS acreage and more than 98 percent of undiscovered, technically recoverable oil and gas resources in federal offshore areas available to consider for future exploration and development. By comparison, the current program puts 94 percent of the OCS off limits. In addition, the program proposes the largest number of lease sales in U.S. history.

La géologie, une science plus que passionnante … et diverse