Archives par mot-clé : History

Climate-driven variability in the occurrence of major floods across North America and Europe

by Glenn A. Hodgkins et al., September 2017 in Journal of Hydrology


 

Trends in major-floods from 1204 sites in North America and Europe are assessed.

Trends based on counting exceedances of flood thresholds for groups of gauges.

The number of significant trends was about the number expected due to chance alone.

Changes in the frequency of major floods are dominated by multidecadal variability.

See also here

Quantifying climatic variability in monsoonal northern China over the last 2200 years and its role in driving Chinese dynastic changes

by J. Li, J. Dodson et al., March 1,  2017 in QuaternSciReviews


We suggest that solar activity may play a key role in driving the climatic fluctuations in North China during the last 22 centuries, with its quasi ∼100, 50, 23, or 22-year periodicity clearly identified in our climatic reconstructions.

We quantitatively illustrate that precipitation (67.4%) may have been more important than temperature (32.5%)…

Solar Cycle Continues To Be The Weakest In 2 Centuries

by  F.  Bosse and  F. Vahrenholt, August 23, in NoTricksZone


The sun was completely free of spots on 11 days in July. Notable: while during last month the sun’s northern hemisphere was more active (in June all sunspots were in the northern hemisphere), last month the southern hemisphere was the most active part with 60% of the sunspots appearing there. The following diagram shows the course of solar cycle 24 thus far (…)

Big data finds the Medieval Warm Period – no denial here

by Jennifer Marohasy, August 22, 2017


Our results show up to 1°C of warming. The average divergence between the proxy temperature record and our ANN projection is just 0.09 degree Celsius. This suggests that even if there had been no industrial revolution and burning of fossil fuels, there would have still been warming through the twentieth century – to at least 1980, and of almost 1°C.

Chinese Academy of Sciences : see here and here,  also here

Most of the Recent Warming Could be Natural

by Jennifer Marohasy, August 21, 2017


AFTER deconstructing 2,000-year old proxy-temperature series back to their most basic components, and then rebuilding them using the latest big data techniques, John Abbot and I show what global temperatures might have done in the absence of an industrial revolution.  The results from this novel technique, just published in GeoResJ, accord with climate sensitivity estimates from experimental spectroscopy but are at odds with output from General Circulation Models.

 

The Little Ice Age And Medieval Warming In South Africa

by Paul Homewood, August 19, 2017


The climate industry likes to pretend that the Little Ice Age was just a local event in Europe, but studies like this one give the lie to that.

Interestingly this Tyson study also includes graphs of historical temperature trends in other parts of the world, for comparison. They all clearly show the MWP and Little Ice Age, although the peaks and troughs don’t always match.

See also here

Global Warming Caused Vikings to Become Terrorists

by David Middleton, August 7, 2017 in WUWT 


So… If climate change caused the Vikings to turn their plowshares into swords, abandoning their farms to become terrorists… the climate change would have been of the warming variety.  I’m not a farmer, but it seems to me that global warming would have actually enhanced the Vikings’ ability to farm up around the Arctic Circle.

Trente épisodes caniculaires entre 1850 et 2006

by Guillaume Séchet, 3 juillet 2017,  in AssociationClimatoRéalistes


… dont août 1911 l’un des mois les plus chauds de l’histoire et 1947 (40°C à Paris les 27 et 28 juillet, record absolu depuis 1873). Emmanuel Leroy Ladurie indique qu’au dix-huitième siècle siècle les canicules pouvaient se répéter plusieurs étés consécutifs : ainsi les années 1705, 1706 et 1707, et le « couple brûlant » (sic) des années 1718 et 1719 « avec sauterelles africaines jusqu’au Languedoc ».

Deaths and Death Rates from Extreme Weather Events: 1900-2008

by  Indur M. Golkany, Ph.D., 2009, in  J. of America. Phys.&Surgeons


Proponents of drastic greenhouse gas controls claim that human greenhouse gas emissions cause global warming, which then exacerbates the frequency and intensity of extreme weather events, including extreme heat, droughts, floods, and storms such as hurricanes and cyclones.

In fact, even though reporting of such events is more complete than in the past, morbidity and mortality attributed to them has declined globally by 93%–98% since the 1920s