Archives par mot-clé : Volcanism

Do 40,000 volcanoes matter?

by JoNova, December 5, 2017


The scope of our ignorance on the sea floor is really something. There are 1,500 active volcanoes on land, but on the sea floor we are still discovering them all the time. at least 39,000 of them rise one kilometer off the sea floor, but there are suspicions there might be up to 3 million, holey moley. The Hilliers paper estimates that 24,000 submarine volcanoes were not yet discovered in 2007.  Wikimedia is trying to list them. Good luck.

Are underwater volcanoes causing global warming? Oceanic eruptions may have a greater effect on climate than first thought

by Richard Gray, February 6, 2015 in MailOnline


 

  • Geophysicists at Columbia University have found underwater volcanoes erupt in regular cycles that range from a fortnight to 100,000 years
  • They claim that volcanoes on the sea floor are currently experiencing a lull
  • They warn an increase in eruptions will contribute more to climate change 
  • Some climate models have assumed they erupt at a steady rate over time
  • The new research shows they change with the seasons and Earth’s orbit 

 

See also here

Potential links between continental rifting, CO2 degassing and climate change through time

by Sascha Brune et al., March 13, 2017 in NatureGeoscience


Using a numerical carbon cycle model, we find that two prominent periods of enhanced rifting 160 to 100 million years ago and after 55 million years ago coincided with greenhouse climate episodes, during which atmospheric CO2 concentrations were more than three times higher than today. We therefore propose that continental fragmentation and long-term climate change could plausibly be linked via massive CO2 degassing in rift systems.

New map of Antarctic geothermal heat suggests Steig & Mann 2009 weren’t measuring ‘global warming’

by Anthony Watts, November 15, 2017 in WUWT


This is quite interesting. Remember the claim in on the front cover of Nature in 2009 by Steig and Mann that Antarctica was warming, thanks to that “special Mannian PCA math sauce” that was applied to air temperature data to smear surface temperature trends over the entire continent? It was dashed by climate skeptics who wrote a paper. It was accepted for publication and disproved (in my opinion) by a team of credible skeptics that wrote a counter-paper. But, there’s an interesting twist thanks to new and surprising data; Steig and Mann may have captured surface air temperature trends in the exact same areas that have been identified as geothermal hot spots.

NASA – Supervolcano may be melting Antarctic ice sheet from below

by Robert, November 10, 2017 in NASA


Confirms what I’ve been saying all along!
NASA scientists admit that a massive heat source almost as hot as the Yellowstone supervolcano may be melting the Antarctic ice sheet from below. 

It seems like a no-brainer to me. I mean, how can lakes and rivers be flowing beneath the ice unless there’s a heat source down there? And if sub-glacial volcanoes can be melting the ice, why couldn’t underwater volcanoes be heating the sea

The effect of giant lateral collapses on magma pathways and the location of volcanism

by F. Maccaferri et al., October 23, 2017 in NatureCommunication

Open Article


The results reveal that a lateral collapse can trigger a significant deflection of deep magma pathways in the crust, favouring the formation of a new eruptive centre within the collapse embayment. Our results have implications for the long-term evolution of intraplate volcanic ocean islands.

Tropical explosive volcanic eruptions can trigger El Niño by cooling tropical Africa

by M. Khodri et al., October 3,  2017 in Nature


Stratospheric aerosols from large tropical explosive volcanic eruptions backscatter shortwave radiation and reduce the global mean surface temperature. Observations suggest that they also favour an El Niño within 2 years following the eruption. Modelling studies have, however, so far reached no consensus on either the sign or physical mechanism of El Niño response to volcanism

Global nickel anomaly links Siberian Traps eruptions and the latest Permian mass extinction

by Michael R. Rampino et al., October 2017, in Nature


Anomalous peaks of nickel abundance have been reported in Permian-Triassic boundary sections in China, Israel, Eastern Europe, Spitzbergen, and the Austrian Carnic Alps. New solution ICP-MS results of enhanced nickel from P-T boundary sections in Hungary, Japan, and Spiti, India suggest that the nickel anomalies at the end of the Permian were a worldwide phenomenon.

See also here and here

Submarine Volcanoes etc.

The most productive volcanic systems on Earth are hidden under an average of 8,500 feet (2,600 m) of water. Beneath the oceans a global system of mid-ocean ridges produces an estimated 75% of the annual output of magma. An estimated 0.7 cubic miles (3 cubic kilometers) of lava is erupted. The magma and lava create the edges of new oceanic plates and supply heat and chemicals to some of the Earth’s most unusual and rare ecosystems.

Volcanic eruptions drove ancient global warming event

by Marcus Gutjah et al., August 30,  2017 in PhysOrg


A natural global warming event that took place 56 million years ago was triggered almost entirely by volcanic eruptions that occurred as Greenland separated from Europe during the opening of the North Atlantic Ocean,

The amount of carbon released during this time was vast—more than 30 times larger than all the fossil fuels burned to date and equivalent to all the current conventional and unconventional fossil fuel reserves we could feasibly ever extract.” Ridgwell said.

An unexpected finding was that enhanced organic matter burial was important in ultimately sequestering the released carbon and accelerating the recovery of the Earth’s ecosystem without massive extinctions.

See also here