USGS Estimates 304 Trillion Cubic Feet of Natural Gas in the Bossier and Haynesville Formations of the U.S. Gulf Coast

USGS, April 13, 2017


The Bossier and Haynesville Formations of the onshore and State waters portion of the U.S. Gulf Coast contain estimated means of 4.0 billion barrels of oil, 304.4 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, and 1.9 billion barrels of natural gas liquids, according to updated assessments by the U.S. Geological Survey. These estimates, the largest continuous natural gas assessment USGS has yet conducted, include petroleum in both conventional and continuous accumulations, and consist of undiscovered, technically recoverable resources.

How inconstant are climate feedbacks – and does it matter?

by Nic Lewis, April 18, 2017


There is as yet no observational evidence that climate sensitivity increases with time in the real climate system – although this cannot be ruled out – nor is it fully understood why it increases in most AOGCMs. In any event, even if real-world climate sensitivity does increase with time, in the longer run other factors that are not reflected in ECS, such as melting ice sheets, are probably more important. Therefore, while time-varying climate sensitivity is of considerable interest from a theoretical point of view, for practical purposes its influence is likely to be very modest.

L’acidification des océans : causes anthropiques versus variabililité naturelle

Usbek, 13 avril 2017


L’acidification n’est pas une simple réponse statique à l’augmentation de la concentration de CO2 dans l’atmosphère : c’est la résultante de processus biologiques et physico-chimiques qui entraînent une répartition inégale du carbone sur la verticale de l’océan. D’autre part la vie océanique a survécu à des niveaux beaucoup plus élevés de CO2 depuis des millions d’années dans le passé.

Le mix énergétique mondial de 1990 à 2035

by planete energies, 03 février 2016


L’ Agence Internationale de l’Énergie (AIE) a élaboré plusieurs scénarios de l’évolution prévisible du mix énergétique d’ici 2035. Le scénario moyen (« New policies scenario ») met en évidence l’augmentation de la demande en énergie primaire, qui passe de 13 000 Mtep en 2011 à 17 400 en 2035. La part des énergies fossiles (pétrole, gaz, charbon) restera largement dominante : elle passerait de 81 % en 2011 à 76 % en 2035. Les énergies renouvelables (y compris hydraulique et biomasse) seront en croissance : de 13 % en 2011 à 18 % en 2035

House Science Committee Hearing

by Judith Curry, March 29, 2017, Professor, School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Georgia Institute of Technology Atlanta


Prior to 2010, I felt that supporting the IPCC consensus on human-caused climate change was the responsible thing to do. That all changed for me in November 2009, following the leaked Climategate emails, that illustrated the sausage making and even bullying that went into building the consensus.. (also, see .pdf)

La route solaire : une idée lumineuse ou une gabegie sans avenir ?

by Olivier Appert, Président du Conseil Français de l’Energie, Avril 2017  in Connaissance des Energies


Il faut se rappeler qu’une innovation est une invention qui a trouvé son marché. Il est vrai que la technologie peut tout ou presque à condition de ne pas aller à l’encontre des lois scientifiques. Mais baser le déploiement d’une technologie sur des subventions publiques durables n’est assurément pas durable!

The formation of gold deposits in South Africa

by S.H.J. Fuchs et al., April 2017, Precambrian Research


German-Canadian research team discovers new ore-forming process in ancient marine sedimentary basin
20 April 2017/Kiel. The Witwatersrand basin in South Africa hosts the largest known gold repository on Earth – but how was it formed? Scientists of the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre of Ocean Research Kiel and Canadian research institutes were able to figure out how parts of the Earth’s largest gold deposits formed about three billion years ago. Crude oil and hot hydrothermal fluids played a major role. This study has been currently published in the journal “Precambrian Research“

BP oil spill did $17.2 billion in damage to natural resources, scientists find

by Virginia Tech, April 20, 2017 in ScienceDaily


The 2010 BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill did $17.2 billion in damage to the natural resources in the Gulf of Mexico, a team of scientists recently found after a six-year study of the impact of the largest oil spill in US history.

This is the first comprehensive appraisal of the financial value of the natural resources damaged by the 134-million-gallon spill.

Politics Disguised as Science: When to Doubt a Scientific ‘Consensus’

by Jay Richards, April 19, 2017


Anyone who has studied the history of science knows that scientists are not immune to the non-rational dynamics of the herd.

This week’s March for Science is odd. Marches are usually held to defend something that’s in peril. Does anyone really think big science is in danger? The mere fact that the March was scheduled for Earth Day betrays what the event is really about: politics.

Slingo Speaks: ‘…no extreme weather or climate event can be attributed solely to climate change”

by By Julio Slingo,  published in the Financial Times, 13 April 2017, Julia Slingo is the former chief scientist of the Met Office,

in WUWT, Anthony Watts


Last December, I retired after nearly eight years as Met Office chief scientist. It was a pleasure and privilege to lead one of the best environmental research organisations in the world at a time when, more than ever, we depend on skilful, comprehensive predictions of the weather, climate and the broader environment.

 

La géologie, une science plus que passionnante … et diverse